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Bombshell Batwoman - Construction Log

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Bombshell Batwoman - Construction Log

Jess Jupiter

Bombshell Wondie is Kearstin.com

Bombshell Wondie is Kearstin.com

So, I've made this costume twice now and I must say, I dig it! It's super comfy and easy to get on and off. It's a great stand-by for a casual costume. 

When I made my first Bombshell Batwoman, the full art and statue hadn't been released so a lot of my design was based on the time period of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (aka, "A League of Their Own"). 

Bombshell Batwoman art by Ant Lucia

Bombshell Batwoman art by Ant Lucia

Costumes from A League of Their Own

Costumes from A League of Their Own

THERES NO CRYING IN BASEBALL.

THERES NO CRYING IN BASEBALL.

I started with a yard and a half of black and red knit in a thicker weight. Thankfully I had already made this costume once out of non-stretch fabric, so I knew that it was a good idea to avoid cottons and linens, despite the movie costumes appearing to be made out of polyester or cotton. 

Batwoman 1.0, made out of non-stretch material. 

Batwoman 1.0, made out of non-stretch material. 

Batwoman 2.0, made out of stretch knits. 

Batwoman 2.0, made out of stretch knits. 

The reason that I opted for a stretch knit fabric was that I personally find them more easy to work with and wanted this design to be pretty fluid when it was worn. When it was made with a non-stretch fabric, I found the hems of the skirt to have too much body and not keep the streamlined silhouette of the uniform that Lucia's art has. 

 

First step was the easiest! I drafted a circle skirt out pattern and cut that out of the red and black fabric. 

 I sewed up the first skirt with a twin needle and hated it (which I know is literally all that Instagram post is, but hey) so I decided to serge everything for this costume. If you want to make this and don't have a serger you can just use an over lock stitch. 

I also let both skirts hang up for a good long while to let their bias stretch do it's thing. Next I cut out a piece for the back using my previous costume as a sort of pattern. Since I lost weight and also was making v2.0 out of stretch fabric, I trimmed down the measurements a bit on the top portion of the uniform, but this was mostly done in the finishing stages. 

Next I used my Cricut Explore to cut out the fabric pieces that spell out "GOTHAM KNIGHTS 52" on the back. The first time I did this costume I did cut them by hand, but I had the equipment to save myself some headache so I used it! The Cricut was only able to cut through one layer of material, so I gently peeled the cut off pieces and applied them to a sheet of EZ Steam. If I had to do this step again, I would probably just cut the pieces by hand, since peeling and re-sticking them caused a bit of fraying at the edges of the lettering. 

THEN CAME THE FUN PART OF APPLIQUE-ING ALL THESE LITTLE FKN LETTERS. 

Comparing the two versions of these costumes, I realized that I used a different font for the applique on the back each time I did it. I personally preferred working with the chunkier font on the first version, but feel the second version photographed better. So, if you really want it to look good, go with a traditional varsity font. If you want an easier time applique-ing go for a chunkier stencil type font. 

Version 1.0 on the left, Version 2.0 on the right. 

Version 1.0 on the left, Version 2.0 on the right. 

After dying from applique-ing for a few days, I worked on the front of the costume. Sadly I don't have any photos of this for either time I did it, but the general principle is that the front was assembled like a wrap dress would be with the front pieces over lapping. I then used a home made double fold bias tape out of the same red knit and went over the front panel of the top and the neckline. You can sort of see what I'm saying in the below photo - 

The I pinned through both layers of the top that were over lapping down the line of red bias tape, cut the bottom of the top to length, and pinned both layers so that all I had to do was run a serger around the waistline to attach the skirt and top together. The skirts were then hemmed with a serger. 

 

For the accessories...

The belt was bought from the Walmart sporting goods section. I bought black baseball socks and appliqued the red stripes onto the tops with a stretch stitch. I bought a black baseball hat and used cross stitching webbing to make them stand up. I appliqued the small red bat onto the hat with a lot of patience. Wig is from Arda Wigs. 

The bat is probably my favorite part of the costume. It's a black wiffle ball bat from Walmart that I made a stencil for and spray painted the logo onto the bat. 

And that's kind of that!